Posts Tagged ‘Moroccan’

Mediterranean Clay Pot Cooking by Paula Wolfert

09/28/2009

Paula has been good to us. She is an avid lover of clay pot cooking and a collector of clay pots. She never hesitates to recommend our tagines. We are happy, in our small way, to help promote her new book: Mediterranean Clay Pot Cooking: Traditional and Modern Recipes to Savor and Share.

Paula, self-described as “the clay pot junkie” has collected clay pots throughout all of her life. In this book, she reveals the ins and outs of clay pot cooking and shares 150 recipes from around the Mediterranean.

Traditional and Modern Recipes to Savor and Share

Traditional and Modern Recipes to Savor and Share

Check out the latest San Francisco Magazine feature on Paula Wolfert!

Job well done Paula!
 

Hospitality Design Show

09/15/2009

We have just concluded a successful trade event at the HD Boutique show in Miami Beach. It is the destination show for hospitality and contract buyers as well as designers seeking the latest in design for hotels and resorts. The attendance was optimistically a great sign of a recovering economy. Thanks to all that have come by our booth!

Hospitality Design Show – Miami Beach

09/08/2009

This coming week, we are exhibiting at the Hospitality Design Show in Miami Beach, September 14-15, 09. Our booth is located in Hall C #1154. Please come by and introduce yourself. 

Hospitality Design Trade Show - Miami Beach FL

HD Boutique differentiates itself from any other tradeshow you’ve seen with its distinct style and unique venue, creating a more personal event where you can build new relationships and discover the newest products.

Our Tagines Just Landed at Caliza Pool!

09/03/2009

Coastal Living magazine Goes Moroccan!

Moroccan Cooking

Moroccan Cooking

Join Peggy Markel on September 6, 09 at Caliza Pool as she demonstrates the art of Moroccan cooking. Peggy Markel has become known as a “food guide extraordinaire” (Food and Wine, 2008). Her Adventures “bring visitors directly into places it would take the lone traveler quite some time to discover, if ever.” (More, 2008).

Food editor Julia Rutland will also be heading to Studio B. for a photo shoot with Peggy Markel.

Classes run September 5–6, 2009, so to meet Julia on the sunny Florida Gulf coast and cook with Peggy, register now at Studio B!

Taste of Morocco with Peggy Markel at Caliza Pool!

Okra Tagine at The Beach!

08/13/2009

OKRA TAGINE RECIPE

What’s for lunch today? The short answer is vegetarian aka Okra with onions and tomatoes, a vegetarian tagine. A simple, light, yet fulfilling recipe that we cook frequently.

Moroccan Okra Tagine Preparation

Moroccan Okra Tagine Preparation

INGREDIENTS:

– 1.5 lbs of okra (we used freshly frozen okra as it is already cleaned and cut. Also, the beach condo has a small kitchen and we try to keep things simple)
– 3 medium tomatoes (we used organic as it was on sale and less expensive than regular vine ripe ones)
– 2 small onions
– 1/4 bunch of parsley
– 1/4 tsp of turmeric
– 1/4 tsp of ginger
– 1/4 tsp of black pepper
– 1 tsp of salt
– 5 tbsp of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO)

That’s it. Really!

PREP:

Clean and cut off the head of okra (see photo), dice tomatoes, thinly slice onions, and chop parsley. Place all ingredients in a large bowl and add all ingredients including the olive oil (see above). Mix it all together and place it in a tagine, a Rifi Tagine in this case.

Mixing it all together

Mixing it all together

Take some of the larger okras and neatly arrange them in a circular fanned fashion to add a pleasant visual component to the tagine and add a 1/4 cup of water.

Set it and Forget it (for only 45 minutes)

Set it and Forget it (for only 45 minutes)

Set the temperature at LO-MED, a setting between low and medium on most stove tops (or a quarter of the way between off and high). Time cooking for 45 minutes and check on the tagine. If sauce is reduced dry, add 2 tbsp of water and let cook for 2 minutes, otherwise, check tenderness of okra and onions. If cooked turn the stove off and let it sit for a few minutes before serving.

Watch it sizzle…

B’saha!

Tadah!

Tadah!

Barton Gym Turns Mo-Rock-An: Moroccan and a little rock ‘n’ roll.

06/05/2009

A featured article is Interior Design Magazine explains how William Sofield  reinvents the David Barton brand with a Miami Beach gym and spa. Berber Trading Company had something to do with it. 

Moroccan Mirrors by Berber Trading Company at David Barton Gym in South Beach

Moroccan Mirrors by Berber Trading Company at David Barton Gym in South Beach

 

Canopies from Berber Trading Company at David Barton Gym in South Beach

Canopy Display from Berber Trading Company at David Barton Gym in South Beach

… The secret is the lighting. Originally, it was so dim that some members complained. And we’re talking about South Beachers! “There were a couple of areas that were a little dark,” Barton allows. “People were bumping into the walls.” Pin spots were added, but the effect is still flattering. Gelled halogens and LEDs turn concrete colums among the rows of machines into pinkish-orange accents. In the words of a local marketing executive who’s been a Barton member for more than a decade, “The lighting is so strategic. You look great in every mirror.” Beneath the atrium’s glass vault, panels punched out like Moroccan tin lanterns filter sunlight during the day and are lit a romantic night-sky-over-Marrakech blue after dark. The lighting both seduces and energizes. “The whole place is about getting buff and having fun,” Sofield says. “David’s members work out hard. Then they party harder than anyone and recuperate faster.”…

Moresque Tea Glasses in “Avant Bride”

07/04/2008

AvantBride reviewed our Moresque Tea Glasses being used at a wedding as votives on the reception tables. Click here for the full posting.

Tagines Summer Sale

07/01/2008

As we’re starting the Summer Season, we would like to share with you a new tested resipe that one of our customers has shared with us. We also offer you a Special Customer Appreciation Discount.  Please use the discount code shown below during checkout and the  total will be  reduced automatically.

Authentic Moroccan Tagines Sale

Authentic Moroccan Tagines Sale

Naima’s Chicken Tagine by Tessa

04/17/2008

INGREDIENTS
3 medium carrots, peeled and cored (if core is bitter) and sliced in half lengthwise
½ Chicken, in pieces
1 large peeled potato, cut in 1 cm thick rounds
1 large green bell pepper, cut in chunks
1 medium red onion, cut in 1 cm thick rounds
2 medium tomatoes, cut in 1 cm thick rounds
2 cloves garlic, sliced
2 tsps ground ginger
½ tsp ground pepper
2 tsps paprika
Dash of yellow food colorant powder, or a few strands crushed saffron
½ cube or 1 tsp chicken bouillon powder
1-2 tsp salt (to taste)
Handful of pitted green olives
6 -8 tbsp olive oil
1/4 cup of water

PREP
Splash 4 tbsp of oil on the bottom of the tagine. Layer your ingredients evenly in the tagine, starting with carrots, then going in order they are written. The carrots must be on the bottom, and the chicken pieces should be on top of the carrots, not touching the bottom of the tagine (When the carrots start to burn, they add delicious flavor and protect the rest of the ingredients – but if anything else burns, that’s not going to taste very good.)  When you get to the spices and salt, sprinkle them evenly overtop the vegetables.  Spread your olives on top, then drizzle the olive oil allover. If water is needed, add it now. Close your tagine and cook until your vegetables are tender, on a very low heat. This may take up to an hour – make sure you have liquid in the tagine or it will burn – and watch out for too much liquid, or it will bubble over.
Once it’s cooked, turn off the heat and drizzle the rest of your olive oil on top. Let the tagine rest for about 10 minutes to cool off, and enjoy!

How To Cure a Tagine

02/15/2008

We receive quite a few questions about tagine curing and cooking. Not only the “how” questions but the “why” as well. Below, I am including a step by step directions on how to cure a tagine at home without any special equipment and just little space.

HOW TO CURE A TAGINE?
It is necessary that it is seasoned before initial use. Please follow these simple instructions below for maximum results:

1. WATER: The new tagine needs to be first submerged in water for at least 1 hour. If you can’t submerge it, place it in a clean sink bowl and slowly fill the base of the tagine with water until it stops absorbing it. Place the tagine lid on top (as shown) and fill it as well. Let stand for 30 minutes to allow full absorption of water into the clay. Empty excess water and set to dry for 5 minutes.

Step 1. Soaking in Water

Step 1. Soaking in Water

2. OLIVE OIL: All you need is 3 table spoons of olive oil, 2 for the base and one for the lid. Spread the olive oil throughout the base and lid with your hand as shown. 

How to cure a Moroccan tagine

Step 2. Rubbing with Olive Oil

3: HEAT: While the tagine is still wet with the oil applied to it, place it in the oven as shown in the first or second photos, and set temperature at 350 F and leave for 45 minutes. The evaporation of moisture creates a vaccum effect to pull the olive oil into the clay which glazes and seals it. Then leave the tagine cool down in the turned off oven.
The last photo shows a cured tagine ready for use.
 

Step 3. Heat Curing in the Oven

Step 3. Heat Curing in the Oven

WHY CURE A TAGINE?
Curing clay pots is as cultural as the cooking itself. If you look up curing clay pots, you will find a variety of processes using a multitude of ingredients ranging from spinach to buttermilk to mustard oil. In order to strengthen (less susceptible to thermal shock) your cooking tagine and get optimum taste that tagine lovers seek at every use, it is necessary to use the process explained above. The use of olive oil has a dual effect. It is as important for sealing clay as it is for flavoring Moroccan cooking. 

TAGINE CLEANING
It is recommended that you hand wash your tagine, as it has not been tested for dishwashers. Do not leave submerged in soapy water.